I read two articles yesterday which suggested to me that 1-in-5 people in leadership positions are confused.

A PwC survey revealed that only “21% of leaders understand the potential value of social media”.

In another survey by Greenwich Associates and reported in Risk Management Magazine, “The study finds that less than 20% of participating companies say their boards of directors fully agree that ERM is a real strategic imperative for their companies.”

Of course we all know about the 1 out of 5 people surveyed who would not recommend Trident sugarless gum to their patients who chew gum.

Therefore, it would appear that people who are proponents of ERM, have cavities and no Twitter accounts.

I read two articles yesterday which suggested to me that 1-in-5 people in leadership positions are confused.

A PwC survey revealed that only “21% of leaders understand the potential value of social media”.

In another survey by Greenwich Associates and reported in Risk Management Magazine, “The study finds that less than 20% of participating companies say their boards of directors fully agree that ERM is a real strategic imperative for their companies.”

Of course we all know about the 1 out of 5 people surveyed who would not recommend Trident sugarless gum to their patients who chew gum.

Therefore, it would appear that people who are proponents of ERM, have cavities and no Twitter accounts.

The Gap got a lot of media (and blog) attention last week for introducing a new Helvetica font logo with a box in the upper right corner which was immediately met with negative public reaction. Some suggested it was designed by a child using PowerPoint. Harsh. While damage was slight, this event will be talked about in business schools and crack the top 10 of stupid corporate moves (#1 is of course New Coke).

Against that backdrop, what is shocking is how nobody noticed that the new Gap logo was as equally lame as – and practically identical to – the new PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) logo released last month to little fanfare, which used Times New Roman and placed a box in the upper right corner as well.